• Candy Skull/Día De Los Muertos Cinco de Mayo/ Plaque/ Routered Painted & Epoxied

    $80.00

    Día de Los Muertos / Cinco de Mayo plaque / Candied Skull

    Custom crafted and hand painted and routed out of a piece of reclaimed Oak.

    We can custom craft a plaque for anyone who has an idea.

    You will not find another one like this.  Original.

    PLEASE NOTE: If this product is on back order it will take at lease 2 weeks before delivery.  Thank you for your patience.

    Specs: 
    Please see close-up pictures for specs and any other details.
    Shipping: 
    If you are purchasing this item and you are outside of the intercontinental united states there will be an extra shipping charge.  So please wait to pay so we can invoice you for the correct shipping.  Thank you for understanding.
    Returns:
    We welcome returns but they are rare for our items as we try to picture and describe them thoroughly.  
    However, if there is an issue please don't hesitate to contact us.  


    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Cinco de Mayo (pronounced [ˈsiŋko ðe ˈmaʝo]Spanish for "Fifth of May") is an annual celebration held on May 5. The date is observed to commemorate the Mexican Army's unlikely victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla, on May 5, 1862, under the leadership of General Ignacio Zaragoza.[1][2]

    In the United States, Cinco de Mayo has taken on a significance beyond that in Mexico.[3][4][5][6] In the U.S. the date has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades.

    In the United States, Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores that initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain.[1][7]

     

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    This article is about the Mexican holiday. For other uses, see Day of the Dead (disambiguation).

    The Day of the Dead (SpanishDía de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and by people of Mexican ancestry living in other places, especially the United States. It is acknowledged internationally in many other cultures. The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. In 2008, the tradition was inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.[1]

    The holiday is sometimes called Día de los Muertos[2][3] in Anglophone countries, a back-translation of its original name, Día de Muertos. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a public holiday. Prior to Spanish colonization in the 16th century, the celebration took place at the beginning of summer. Gradually, it was associated with October 31, November 1, and November 2 to coincide with the Western Christianity triduum of AllhallowtideAll Saints' EveAll Saints' Day, and All Souls' Day.[4][5] Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using calaverasaztec marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts.[6] Visitors also leave possessions of the deceased at the graves.

    Scholars trace the origins of the modern Mexican holiday to indigenous observances dating back hundreds of years and to an Aztecfestival dedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl. The holiday has spread throughout the world, being absorbed into other deep traditions in honor of the dead. It has become a national symbol and as such is taught (for educational purposes) in the nation's schools. Many families celebrate a traditional "All Saints' Day" associated with the Catholic Church.

    Originally, the Day of the Dead as such was not celebrated in northern Mexico, where it was unknown until the 20th century because its indigenous people had different traditions. The people and the church rejected it as a day related to syncretizing pagan elements with Catholic Christianity. They held the traditional 'All Saints' Day' in the same way as other Christians in the world. There was limited Mesoamerican influence in this region, and relatively few indigenous inhabitants from the regions of Southern Mexico, where the holiday was celebrated. In the early 21st century in northern Mexico, Día de Muertos is observed because the Mexican government made it a national holiday based on educational policies from the 1960s; it has introduced this holiday as a unifying national tradition based on indigenous traditions.[7][8][9]

    The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration is similar to other societies' observances of a time to honor the dead. The Spanish tradition, for instance, includes festivals and parades, as well as gatherings of families at cemeteries to pray for their deceased loved ones at the end of the day.[10